Airline porno

Airline porno

Jump to navigation Jump to search This article is about body scanners for security purposes. For other airline porno scanning technologies, see 3D body scanning. The examples and perspective in this article deal primarily with the United States and do not represent a worldwide view of the subject.

A full-body scanner is a device that detects objects on a person's body for security screening purposes, without physically removing clothes or making physical contact. Depending on the technology used, the operator may see an alternate-wavelength image of the person's naked body, or merely a cartoon-like representation of the person with an indicator showing where any suspicious items were detected. Starting in 2007, full-body scanners started supplementing metal detectors at airports and train stations in many countries. Backscatter X-ray machines use low dose penetrating radiation for detecting suspicious metallic and non-metallic objects hidden under clothing or in shoes and in the cavities of the human body. There has been considerable debate with regard to how safe this technology is. Through-body X-Ray security scanners that emit a high level of radiation have been supplied by the US to at least two African countries. Passengers and advocates have objected to images of their naked bodies being displayed to screening agents or recorded by the government.

Critics have called the imaging virtual strip searches without probable cause, and have suggested they are illegal and violate basic human rights. The first full body security scanner was developed by Dr. Steven W Smith, who developed the Secure 1000 whole body scanner in 1992. He subsequently sold the device and associated patents to Rapiscan Systems, who now manufacture and distribute the device. Office of Science and Technology and the United States Air Force Research Laboratory. Safety aspects of the Secure 1000 have been investigated in the US by the Food and Drug Administration and National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements since the early 1990s. This section needs to be updated.